Close up | Guide to the Fujifilm X series

Through three generations of the X-Trans sensor, through many sophisticated viewfinders, and through a smorgasbord of retro-styled camera bodies, the Fujifilm X series has come a long way. Comprising a mix of compacts and CSCs, the series blends vintage cool with serious imaging power.

If you’re new to the series, it’s easy to get lost just finding a place to begin. Read on as we break down the different camera lines within the series, and let us help you find the right Fuji X model for you…

The X100 series

It all began in 2011. Photographers and journalists alike were caught off-guard by one particular announcement at Photokina – a new compact camera from Fujifilm, eschewing the clunky, DSLR-style handling of previous models in favour of a sleek, retro-inspired design that would become the series’ hallmark. That was the Fujifilm X100, then known as the Fujifilm FinePix X100, an ungainly middle name that would swiftly be dropped.

Pairing a fixed 35mm lens with a 12.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor (the famous X-Trans sensor debuted a little later), the X100 uses a hybrid optical and electrical viewfinder, allowing the user to switch between the two modes at will.

The X100 was followed up in 2013 with the X100S, incorporating the second generation of the X-Trans CMOS sensor, with 16.3MP of resolution and no optical low-pass filter. The sensor allows for fast phase-detection autofocus with acquisition times as low as 0.08sec. Fujifilm also fine-tuned the controls, responding to some of the criticisms of the X100.

In 2014, Fujifilm updated the line with the X100T, which used the same sensor and lens combination as the X100S but added the option of an electronic shutter capable of shooting at up to 1/32,000sec, as well as built-in Wi-Fi, a more advanced viewfinder, face recognition and more.

Now, this is where it gets slightly confusing, but bear with us. In 2016 Fuji released the X70, which sounds as though it should belong with the X10, X20 and others of that nature, but doesn’t. Whereas those are small zoom compacts, the X70 sports a prime lens and is more like a mini-X100T. So, despite, the name, it really belongs with the rest of the X100 cameras.

The most recent model in the line is the X100F, which was announced in January 2017. The significant gap between models meant considerable improvements, among them the third generation 24.3MP X-Trans III CMOS sensor and the X-Processor Pro image engine. The X100F wowed reviewers and photographers with its fast and accurate 91-point autofocus system, and its large viewfinder with a 60fps refresh rate.

Fujifilm X100F

  • Sensor: 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor
  • Lens: 23mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 35mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 8fps
  • ISO range: 200-12,800 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder

Fujifilm X70

  • Sensor: 16.3MP Fujifilm X-Trans CMOS II APS-C sensor
  • Lens: 18.5mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 28mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 8fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: No

Fujifilm X100T

  • Sensor: 16.3MP Fujifilm X-Trans CMOS II APS-C sensor
  • Lens: 23mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 35mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder

Fujifilm X100S

  • Sensor: 16.3MP Fujifilm X-Trans CMOS II APS-C sensor
  • Lens: 23mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 35mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder

Fujifilm X100

  • Sensor: 12MP APS-C sensor
  • Lens: 23mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 35mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 5fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-12,800)
  • Viewfinder: 1.44-million-dot hybrid viewfinder

 

The X-Pro series

The Fujifilm X-Pro1 was the first indication that the X-series could be the real deal for pros, being the first X camera to take XF lenses. Launching in 2012, its sturdy, pro-quality build was an indicator of the quality within. It was the first camera to use the now-famous X-Trans sensor, and its resolutely dial-based control system won over legions of photographers who wanted a tactile handling experience. Reviews praised its high-ISO performance and its hybrid viewfinder, and the X-Pro1 was a deserved smash hit.

Photographers had to wait four long years for the difficult second album, but happily Fujifilm didn’t bottle the sequel. The X-Pro2 was an update with everything pro photographers wanted, delivering the latest X-Trans sensor to provide lossless compressed 14-bit Raw capture, as well as a wider ISO sensitivity range which could be used for both Raw and JPEG shooting (many previous X-series models would only shoot JPEGs) in the higher ISO bands.

Fujifilm X-Pro2

  • Sensor: 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 14fps
  • ISO range: 200-12,800 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: 3.69-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: 4K/30p 4:2:0 8-bit internal recording at a maximum of 200Mbps

Fujifilm X-Pro1

  • Sensor: 16MP X-Trans CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: 1.44-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 324p

 

The X-H series

The Fujifilm X-series has unquestionably been an enormous success for photographers, revitalising the brand’s fortunes with a superb selection of stylish cameras. However, there’s generally not been a lot to tempt videographers away from reliable workhorses like Canon or exciting upstarts like Sony.

The Fujifilm X-H1 represents the first real attempt to change that. Announced in 2018, the X-H1 is capable of 4K/30p 4:2:0 8-bit internal recording at a maximum of 200Mbps, with an HDMI out and a new dedicated video menu. Full HD video can also be captured at the super slow rate of 120fps, while there’s also F-log video recording direct-to-card available. All of Fuji’s film simulation modes can be used on video footage, and there’s an external microphone socket as well as a headphone jack for monitoring audio.

The X-H1 is also the first in the X series to come packing in-body image stabilisation (IBIS), and it has an overhauled design with a larger grip and new leaf-spring shutter release button. The shutter sound is also the quietest in Fujifilm’s stable.

The X-H1 represents an exciting move forward for the X-series, and promises that Fujifilm isn’t done innovating just yet.

Fujifilm X-H1

  • Sensor: 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 14fps
  • ISO range: 200-12,800 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: 3.69-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: 4K/30p 4:2:0 8-bit internal recording at a maximum of 200Mbps

 

The X-E series

After the much-hyped announcement of the X-Pro1, enthusiast and amateur photographers were very interested to know when they could get hold of an interchangeable-lens X-series camera that wouldn’t cost them the earth. That came in the form of the X-E1, a slimmed down X-Pro1 that gave prospective X-system users a second body option. It used an EVF instead of the hybrid viewfinder of the X-Pro1.

This was followed up with the X-E2, boasting 60 improvements over its predecessor including the X-Trans II sensor, built-in Wi-Fi and an improved EVF. Fujifilm refreshed this camera with a minor update in 2016 — the X-E2S, which boasted a few tine-ups such as a higher ISO ceiling, improved autofocus and a new electronic shutter offering maximum shooting speeds of 1/32,000sec.

The following year, Fujifilm delivered the X-E3, a more comprehensive update with the latest in sensor technology. A larger shooting buffer, a faster autofocusing algorithm for improved tracking, 4K video recording and a redesigned ergonomic body were just some of the improvements that made the X-E3 as well-received as the cameras that came before.

Fujifilm X-E3

  • Sensor: 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 14fps
  • ISO range: 200-12,800 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: 4K/30p 4:2:0 8-bit internal recording at a maximum of 200Mbps

Fujifilm X-E2S

  • Sensor: 16.3MP Fujifilm X-Trans CMOS II APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 7fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 60p

Fujifilm X-E2

  • Sensor: 16.3MP Fujifilm X-Trans CMOS II APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 7fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 60p

Fujifilm X-E1

  • Sensor: 16MP X-Trans CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot electronic viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 24p

 

The X-T series

Following the success of the X-Pro1, Fujifilm set about bolstering its high-end offering with the release of the X-T1 in 2014. The 16.3MP X-Trans CMOS II sensor and X-Processor II are housed within a weather-resistant body designed for rugged, outdoor shooting, with 75 seals designed to keep out dust and water. Add on a beefed up LCD and viewfinder, an optional battery grip and improvements in burst shooting and AF speed (a lean 0.08 seconds), and you’ve got a camera with the imaging spec of contemporaries like the X-E2, but with the build, features and ergonomics required by pros.

Of course, not everyone can afford the pro price tag, and Fujifilm went about wooing those with a little less cash to flash by introducing a smaller counterpart to the X-T1 — the X-T10. Featuring the same imaging internals as its bigger brother, the X-T10 provides a compromise with a smaller viewfinder and LCD, as well as a generally smaller body that lacks weather sealing.

When it came time to update the X-T1, Fujifilm delivered the superb X-T2, outfitted with the latest-generation sensor and an overhauled AF system, as well as a viewfinder offering twice the brightness of the X-T1’s. The X-T2 was also the first member of the X series to offer 4K video recording, shooting a bit rate of 100Mbps and at a maximum resolution of 30p.

In a move that surprised nobody, Fujifilm also brought out a miniature version of the X-T2, the X-T20. It followed the format of the X-T10, using the same sensor as its bigger brother, but skipping a few features such as a second card slot and a fully articulating screen in order to deliver a smaller camera, for a lower price.

Fujifilm X-T20

  • Sensor: 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 14fps
  • ISO range: 200-12,800 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: 4K at 30p

Fujifilm X-T2

  • Sensor: 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 14fps
  • ISO range: 200-12,800 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: 4K at 30p

Fujifilm X-T10

  • Sensor: 16.3MP Fujifilm X-Trans CMOS II APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 8fps
  • ISO range: 200-6,400 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 60p

Fujifilm X-T1

  • Sensor: 16.3MP Fujifilm X-Trans CMOS II APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 8fps
  • ISO range: 200-6,400 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot hybrid viewfinder
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 60p

 

The XQ series

A selection of dinky, pocketable compacts, the Fujifilm XQ cameras are ideal for enthusiasts who need something light. Despite its size, the XQ1 manages to pack in some advanced features such as Raw shooting, while its successor the XQ2 adds the Classic Chrome film simulation mode and a retro black finish.

Fujifilm XQ2

  • Sensor: 12MP 2/3-inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor
  • Lens: 6.4-25.6mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 25-100mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 12fps
  • ISO range: 100-3200 (expandable to 12,800)
  • Viewfinder: No

Fujifilm XQ1

  • Sensor: 12MP 2/3-inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor
  • Lens: 6.4-25.6mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 25-100mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 12fps
  • ISO range: 100-3200 (expandable to 12,800)
  • Viewfinder: No

 

The X-A series

The X-A compact system cameras are the cheapest interchangeable lens cameras in the Fuji line-up, designed with the entry-level user in mind. The range has gone through a fair few models: first the X-A1 in 2013, which offered a small and light body to use X lenses on, without the X-Trans sensor. This was followed by the X-A2, which was billed as a selfie camera thanks to its about-facing LCD screen and variety of selfie-modes. Fujifilm next bulked out the line with a more advanced offering, the X-A3, and a new slimmed-down entry-level model, the X-A10. Finally, in 2018 came the X-A5, which brought in phase-detect AF tracking and limited 4K functionality.

Fujifilm X-A5

  • Sensor: 24.2MP CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 6fps
  • ISO range: 200-12,800 (expandable to 100-51,200)
  • Viewfinder: No
  • Max video resolution: 4K at 15p (max 5 minutes)

Fujifilm X-A10

  • Sensor: 16.3MP CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: No
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 30p

Fujifilm X-A3

  • Sensor: 24.2MP CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: No
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 60p

Fujifilm X-A2

  • Sensor: 16MP CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 5.6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: No
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 30p

Fujifilm X-A1

  • Sensor: 16MP CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Burst speed: 5.6fps
  • ISO range: 200-6400 (expandable to 100-25,600)
  • Viewfinder: No
  • Max video resolution: Full HD at 30p

 

The X_0 series

The X_0 cameras are another compact range, smaller and less prestigious than the X100 series, with zoom lenses rather than primes. With more affordable price tags, they are ideal for the beginning photographer or light traveller, and have actually been around more or less since the series’ inception, with the FinePix X10 debuting shortly after the X100 in 2011, sporting a smaller 2/3-inch sensor and a 28-112mm equivalent lens. This was replaced in 2013 by the X20, which sported a new 2/3-inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor and a new viewfinder, and then the X30 the following year, which ditched the optical viewfinder in favour of an electronic model.

Fujifilm X30

  • Sensor: 12MP 2/3-inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor
  • Lens: 7.1-28.4mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 28-112mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 12fps
  • ISO range: 100-3200 (expandable to 12,800)
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot electronic viewfinder

Fujifilm X20

  • Sensor: 12MP 2/3-inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor
  • Lens: 7.1-28.4mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 28-112mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 12fps
  • ISO range: 100-3200 (expandable to 12,800)
  • Viewfinder: Optical viewfinder with 85% coverage

Fujifilm X10

  • Sensor: 12MP 2/3-inch EXR-CMOS sensor
  • Lens: 7.1-28.4mm Fujinon lens (equivalent to 28-112mm on a 35mm format)
  • Burst speed: 10fps
  • ISO range: 100-6400 (expandable to 12,800)
  • Viewfinder: Optical viewfinder with 85% coverage
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